ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

The elementary school program encompasses grades one to five. Core subjects of English, Maths, Science, Social Studies, and Spelling are taught by the classroom teachers. Specialists teach music, I.T, and physical education.

GRADE 1-4 SOCIAL STUDIES CURRICULUM

The Social Studies Curriculum covers both history and geography in the elementary years. It is also important that the students cover a unit theme in ‘Community’.

The curriculum provides the opportunity to prepare students with the skills for a socially, politically, economically and geographically changing world where understanding, knowledge and interdependence are essential.

Grade 1

TERM 1
My History, Where I Live and My School

TERM 2
Features of communities around the world

TERM 3
Introduction to Ancient Romans

Grade 2

TERM 1
Rural and Urban Communities/ Case Study- River

TERM 2
Aztecs- An Ancient Civilisation

TERM 3
Medieval Period

Grade 3

TERM 1
Early Civilisations to Global Community

TERM 2
Ancient Greece

TERM 3
Ancient Egypt

Grade 4

TERM 1
Vikings

TERM 2
Aspects of Citizenship and Government

TERM 3
The Ancient Romans

Download pdf: Social Studies Grade 1-4

GRADE 1-4 SCIENCE CURRICULUM

Grade 1

  • Needs and Characteristics of Living Things
  • Materials, Objects, and Everyday Structures
  • Energy in Our Lives
  • Daily and Seasonal Changes

Grade 2

  • Growth and Changes in Animals
  • Movement
  • Properties of Liquids and Solids
  • Air and Water in the Environment

Grade 3

  • Growth and Changes in Plants
  • Strong and Stable Structures
  • Forces Causing Movement
  • Soils in the Environment

Grade 4

  • Habitats and Communities
  • Pulleys and Gears
  • Light and Sound
  • Rocks and Minerals

Download pdf: Science Grade 1-4

GRADE 1-5 ART CURRICULUM

Saint Francis students gain experience with many different forms and principles of art. It is our aim to help the children realise the ways in which art can be experienced both as an expres- sive form of oneself, and a reflection of the world about us- past, present and future.

By the end of Grade 5, the students will have worked with a variety of strands and materials:

  • drawing
  • relief sculpture and 3D- eg. clay, DAS, recyclable materials
  • jewelry making
  • mixed media
  • photography
  • collage
  • printmaking
  • mosaics
  • craft
  • graphic design

Art work is often incorporated into other parts of the curriculum, and contributes to a deeper understanding of a topic. Children also go on school trips to exhibitions and museums to broaden their experience of the art world.

The year culminates in the ‘SFIS Artfest’ which involves each class working with an overall given theme. Each child will complete both an individual piece and a group/ class art piece. Parents are invited to view the students’ work at the International Picnic.

Download pdf: Art Grade 1-5

GRADE 1-5 LITERACY CURRICULUM

Kindergarten:

  • Oral and written language becomes a vital part of the school day in kindergarten
  • The child will increase the complexity of their spoken language
  • A beginning understanding of the conventions of language is a part of the kindergarten experience
  • The child will continue to make the transition from oral literacy to written literacy, developing their concepts about print, during the kindergarten year
  • Children begin to develop some sight words
  • The child also begins to recognise sentences, and is introduced to the idea that thosesentences begin with capital letters and end with some type of punctuation
  • The child will develop the understanding that writing is used for a variety of reasons
  • Students develop the ability to sustain their attention for an age-appropriate length of time

Grade 1

  • Students who enter first grade continue phonological development, making major growth in learning to read
  • They develop more advanced phonics skills and begin to build a bank of sight words
  • They read, listen to, and discuss more complex stories, and begin to make connectionswith their own experiences
  • They are able to begin to self-correct their reading
  • The students make major developments in their writing, learning to write a story that shows more focus and organisation
  • The conventions of language gain importance to first graders as they begin to desire neatness and correctness
  • They begin to learn the rules of language and spelling
  • First graders show evidence of expanding their language repertoire, including increasingthe appropriate use of more formal language
  • First graders are learning to read and write both for information and pleasure

Grade 2

  • Second graders begin a transition from learning to read to reading to learn
  • They begin to read more fluently. Having a firmer grasp on phonics, second graders beginmore complex word studies
  • They begin to read longer, more complex texts in a variety of genres
  • They continue to read every day and have books read to them
  • Writing becomes more independent, and they develop more conscientious skills about editing and revising their work
  • Conventions become part of the every day writing experience as they develop their understanding of the parts of speech
  • Second graders expand sentences and learn new sentence structures and the punctuations that occurs with them
  • Their written and spoken vocabulary becomes much more complex, including the use of a variety of language registers
  • They engage in a variety of language and literary activities as they gain independence and mastery of reading, writing, speaking and listening

Grade 3

  • Third graders are able to read much more widely on a variety of topics with more complex texts
  • They enjoy a variety of genres, including fiction, non-fiction and poetry
  • They further develop their skills to read aloud with ever-increasing fluency and comprehension
  • Third grade students read more thoughtfully, discover more details and extract deeper meaning in what they read
  • They are able to work more independently on research projects, producing more meaningful writing
  • With guidance, they use all steps of the writing process in their own compositions and reports
  • They are becoming more adept in identifying the main points from fiction and non-fiction texts, and are introduced to more abstract skills of synthesis and evaluation in writing
  • By the end of third grade, they are aware of the importance of correct spelling and the conventions of language
  • Third graders respond more logically to questions with increased vocabulary and wider range of language structures
  • They are aware of different registers of language, and are able to vary language patterns in both speaking and writing

Grade 4

  • In the fourth grade, students expand and deepen their knowledge of reading, writing, and speaking, as well as their understanding of the connections among different types of communication
  • Fourth grade students read and comprehend texts from a variety of genres (fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama), and they can understand and learn from texts without having a teacher preview the material for them
  • Students also read and understand informational texts from other subject areas in addition to language arts
  • Students are ready for opportunities to discuss books and to expand their vocabularies for deeper comprehension of texts
  • They understand and articulate how authors use a variety of techniques and craft in their writing, and they show evidence of the author’s craft in their own writing
  • Students participate in a cooperative learning environment, and they move independently around the room to gain information from other students
  • Fourth graders are also ready for more complex assignments that ask them to use sources to inform their oral and written discussions of topics

Grade 5

  • In the fifth grade, students expand and deepen the concepts, skills, and strategies learned in earlier grades
  • Fifth grade students are able to read and comprehend texts from a variety of genres and subject areas
  • They begin to study subjects in a more formal way, and show evidence of making more connections as they encounter new ideas
  • Students write every day for a variety of purposes and audiences, and in order to maximise and formalise their writing skills
  • Students communicate their personal voices by expressing ideas in their writing
  • They are able to understand and articulate how authors use a variety of techniques and show evidence of the author’s craft in their own writing
  • Fifth graders continue to increase their vocabulary knowledge through reading, word study, discussion, and content area study
  • In verbal interactions, students communicate effectively with different audiences about a variety of texts and concepts
  • Students work cooperatively in a variety of situations, assuming productive roles within each group
  • Fifth graders also complete more complex assignments using sources to inform their oral and written discussions
  • Students are able to understand a problem or conflict as stated in oral, visual, or written texts, and they can determine an appropriate solution
  • In this process, students utilise previous knowledge and experience, draw conclusions and/or make valid generalisations, and apply logic to develop possible solutions
  • Fifth grade students support solutions with a variety of evidence and reasons

Download pdf: Literacy Grade 1-5

 GRADE 1-5 MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM

Grade 1

Number Sense and Numeration
By the end of Grade 1, students will:

  • Represent, compare, and order whole numbers to 50, using a wide variety of tools
  • Read and print in whole numbers to ten using meaningful contexts
  • Identify and describe various EU coins, and add and subtract money amounts to 10cents
  • Estimate and demonstrate, using concrete materials, the concept of one-to-one correspondence
  • Count forward by 1’s, 2’s, 5’s and 10’s to 100 using a variety of tools and strategies
  • Count backwards from 20 by 5’s and 2’s and 1’s, using a variety of tools
  • Use ordinal numbers to thirty-first in meaningful contexts
  • Solve a variety of problems involving the addition and subtraction of whole numbers to 20, using concrete materials and drawings

Measurement
By the end of Grade 1, students will:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the use of non-standard units of the same size formeasuring
  • Estimate, measure and record lengths, heights and distances with non-standard units
  • Estimate, measure and describe area, through investigation using non-standard units
  • Estimate, measure and describe the passage of time by identifying benchmark times
  • Name the months of the year in order, and read the date on a calendar
  • Relate temperature to experiences of the seasons

Geometry and Spatial Sense
By the end of Grade 1, students will:

  • Identify and describe common two-dimensional shapes and sort and classify them by theirattributes using concrete materials and picture representations
  • Trace and identify the two-dimensional faces of three-dimensional figures, using concrete models
  • Identify and describe common three dimensional figures and sort and classify them by their attributes using concrete materials and pictorial representations
  • Locate shapes in the environment that have symmetry, and create symmetrical designs
  • Describe the relative locations of objects or people using positional language (e.g., over, under, above, below, in front of, behind, inside, outside, beside, between, along)

Patterning and Algebra
By the end of Grade 1, students will:

  • Identify, describe, create and extend, through investigation, geometric repeating patterns
  • Describe numeric repeating patterns in a hundreds chart
  • Create a set in which the number of objects is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in a given set

Data Management and Probability
By the end of Grade 1, students will:

  • Demonstrate an ability to organise objects into categories by sorting and classifying objects using one attribute
  • Collect and organise primary data (e.g., data collected by the class) that is categorical and display the data using one-to-one correspondence
  • Read primary data presented in concrete graphs and pictographs, and describe the data using comparative language
  • Answer and begin to pose questions about collected data
  • Begin to describe the likelihood that everyday events will occur, using mathematicallanguage (e.g., impossible, unlikely, less likely, more likely, certain)

Grade 2

Number Sense and Numeration
By the end of Grade 2, students will:

  • Represent, compare, and order whole numbers to 100, including money amounts to 100c, using a variety of tools
  • Read and print in words whole numbers to one hundred, using meaningful contexts
  • Compose and decompose two-digit numbers in a variety of ways, using concrete materials
  • Determine, using concrete materials, the ten that is nearest to a given two-digit number
  • Determine, through investigation using concrete materials, the relationship between the number of fractional parts and compare using concrete materials
  • Count forward by 1’s, 2’s, 5’s, 10’s and 25’s to 200 , using number lines and hundreds charts
  • Count backwards by 1’s from 100 and any number less than 100, and count backwards by 10’s from 500
  • Solve problems involving the addition and subtraction of whole numbers to 100, using a variety of mental strategies
  • Represent and explain, through investigation using concrete materials and drawings, multiplication as the combining of equal groups
  • Represent and explain, through investigation using concrete materials and drawings, division as the sharing of a quantity equally
  • Add and subtract money amounts to 50 euro, using a variety of tools

Measurement
By the end of Grade 2, students will:

  • Estimate, and measure length, height, and distance, using standard units (i.e., centimetre, metre) and non-standard units
  • Estimate, measure, and record area, through investigation using a variety of non-standard units
  • Estimate, measure, and record the capacity and/or mass of an object, using a variety of non-standard units
  • Tell and write time to the quarter hour, using demonstration digital and analogue clocks
  • Describe how changes in temperature affect everyday experiences
  • Determine, through investigation, the relationship between days and weeks and between months and years.

Geometry and Spatial Sense
By the end of Grade 2, students will:

  • Identify and describe various polygons
  • Identify and describe various three-dimensional figures and sort and classify them
  • Create models and skeletons of prisms and pyramids, using concrete materials
  • Locate the line of symmetry in a two-dimensional shape
  • Compose and describe pictures, designs, and patterns by combining two-dimensional shapes
  • Build a structure using three-dimensional figures, and describe the two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional figures in the structure
  • Describe the relative locations and the movements of objects on a map in simple language
  • Draw simple maps of familiar settings
  • Create and describe symmetrical designs

Patterning and Algebra
By the end of Grade 2, students will:

  • Represent, through investigation with concrete materials and pictures, two number expressions that are equal, using the equal sign
  • Determine the missing number in equations involving addition and subtraction to 18 Identify, through investigation, and use the commutative property of addition
  • Create a repeating pattern by combining two attributes
  • Identify, through investigation, and use the commutative property of addition

Data Management and Probability
By the end of Grade 2, students will:

  • Demonstrate an ability to organise objects into categories, by sorting and classifying objects using two attributes simultaneously
  • Collect and organise and describe primary data and display the data using one-to-one correspondence in concrete graphs, pictographs, line plots, simple bar graphs, and other graphic organisers, with appropriate titles and labels
  • Demonstrate an understanding of data displayed in a graph, by comparing different parts of the data and by making statements about the data as a whole
  • Describe probability as a measure of the likelihood that an event will occur, using mathematical language (i.e., impossible, unlikely, less likely, equally likely, more likely, certain)

Number Sense and Numeration
By the end of Grade 3, students will:

Grade 3

  • Represent, compare and order whole numbers to 1000, using a variety of tools
  • Read and print in words whole numbers to one hundred
  • Compose and decompose three-digit numbers into hundreds, tens, and ones in a variety of ways, using concrete materials
  • Round two-digit numbers to the nearest ten and hundred
  • Divide whole objects and sets of objects into equal parts, and identify the parts usingfractional names
  • Estimate, count, and represent (using the Euro symbol) the value of a collection of coins and bills with a maximum value of 10 euro
  • Solve problems that arise from real-life situations and that relate to the magnitude of whole numbers up to 1000
  • Count forward by 1’s, 2’s, 5’s, 10’s, and 100’s to 1000 from various starting points, and by 25’s to 1000 starting from multiples of 25, using a variety of tools and strategies
  • Count backwards by 2’s, 5’s, and 10’s from 100 using multiples of 2, 5, and 10 as starting points, and count backwards by 100’s from 1000
  • Solve problems involving the addition and subtraction of two-digit numbers, using a variety of mental strategies
  • Add and subtract three-digit numbers, using concrete materials, student generated algorithms, and standard algorithms
  • Use estimation when solving problems
  • Add and subtract money amounts, using a variety of tools
  • Multiply to 12x12and divide to 49 -: 7, using a variety of mental strategies

Measurement
By the end of Grade 3, students will:

  • Estimate, measure, and record length, height, and distance, using standard units Draw items using a ruler, given specific lengths in centimetres
  • Read time using analogue clocks
  • Estimate, read and record positive temperatures to the nearest degree Celsius
  • Estimate, measure and record the perimeter of two-dimensional shapes
  • Estimate, measure and record area- using grid paper
  • Choose benchmarks for a kilogram and a litre to help them perform measurement tasks
  • Estimate, measure and record the mass of objects
  • Estimate, measure and record the capacity of containers
  • Compare and order objects on the basis of linear measurements in centimetres and /or metres
  • Compare and order a collection of objects, using standard units of mass
  • Begin to solve problems involving the relationships between minutes and hours, hours anddays, days and weeks, and weeks and years, using a variety of tools

Geometry and Spatial Sense
By the end of Grade 3, students will:

  • Use a reference tool to identify right angles
  • Identify and compare various polygons
  • Compare and sort prisms and pyramids by geometric properties
  • Construct rectangular prisms
  • Identify and describe the two-dimensional shapes that can be found in a three-dimensional figure
  • Describe movement from one location to another using a grid map Identify flips, slides, and turns
  • Complete and describe designs that have a line of symmetryPatterning and Algebra

Patterns and relationships
By the end of Grade 3, students will:

  • Identify, extend, and create a repeating pattern involving two attributes
  • Identify and describe and create, through investigation, number patterns involving addition, subtraction, and multiplication
  • Determine, through investigation, the inverse relationship between addition and subtraction
  • Determine, the missing number in equations involving addition and subtraction of one andtwo-digit numbers, using a variety of tools and strategies
  • Identify, through investigation, the properties of zero and one in multiplication
  • Identify, through investigation, and use the associative property of addition to facilitate computation with whole numbersData

Management and Probability
By the end of Grade 3, students will:

  • Demonstrate an ability to organise objects into categories, by sorting and classifying objects using two or more attributes simultaneously
  • Collect data by conducting a simple survey
  • Collect and organise data and display the data in charts, tables and graphs
  • Read primary data represented in charts, tables and graphs
  • Interpret and draw conclusions from data presented in charts, tables and graphs
  • Predict the frequency of an outcome in a simple probability experiment or game

 Grade 4

Number Sense and Numeration
By the end of Grade 4, students will:

  • Represent, compare, and order whole numbers to 10,000, using a variety of tools
  • Demonstrate an understanding of place value in whole numbers and decimal numbers from 0.1 to 10,000 using a variety of tools and strategies
  • Read and print in words whole numbers to one thousand
  • Round four-digit whole numbers to the nearest ten, hundred, and thousand in problems
  • Represent, compare and order fractions using concrete materials, words, and standard fractional notation
  • Demonstrate and explain the relationship between equivalent fractions
  • Solve problems that arise from real-life situations and that relate to the magnitude of wholenumbers up to 10,000
  • Add and subtract two-digit numbers, using a variety of mental strategies
  • Read and represent, add and subtract money amounts by making simulated purchases and providing change for amounts up to 100 euro
  • Multiply to 12×12 and divide to 81 by 9
  • Solve problems involving the multiplication of one-digit whole numbers
  • Multiply whole numbers by 10, 100, and 1000, and divide whole numbers by 10 and 100
  • Multiply two and three digit whole numbers by one, two and three digit whole numbers
  • Divide two and three digit whole numbers by one and two digit whole numbers
  • To begin to use estimation when solving problems and explain, through investigation, the relationship between fractions and decimals to tenths

Measurement
By the end of Grade 4, students will:

  • Estimate, measure, and record length, height, and distance, using standard units
  • Draw items using a ruler, given specific lengths in millimetres or centimetres
  • Estimate, measure and represent time intervals and elapsed time to the nearest minute
  • Estimate, measure and record the perimeter and area of polygons
  • Estimate, measure and record the mass of objects, using the standard units
  • Estimate, measure and record the capacity of containers, using the standard units
  • Estimate, measure using concrete materials, and record volume
  • Describe through investigation, the relationship between various units of length
  • Begin to determine, through investigation, the relationship between the side lengths of a rectangle and its perimeter and area
  • Solve problems involving the relationship between years and decades and centuries

Geometry
By the end of Grade 4, students will:

  • Draw the lines of symmetry of two-dimensional shapes
  • Identify and compare different types of quadrilaterals
  • Identify benchmark angles using a reference tool and compare other angles to these benchmarks
  • Identify and describe prisms and pyramids, and classify them by their geometric properties
  • Construct three-dimensional figures from a picture or model of the figure
  • Identify and describe the general location of an object using a grid system
  • Create and analyse symmetrical designs

Patterning and Algebra
By the end of Grade 4, students will:

  • Create a number pattern involving addition, subtraction, or multiplication, given a pattern rule expressed in words
  • Determine through investigation, the inverse relationship between multiplication and division
  • Determine the missing number in equations involving multiplication
  • Identify, through investigation and use the commutative property of multiplication
  • Identify, through investigation and use the distributive property of multiplication over addition

Data Management and Probability
By the end of Grade 4, students will:

  • Begin to collect and organize discrete primary data and display the data in charts, tables, and graphs that have appropriate titles, labels, and scales
  • Read, interpret, and draw conclusions from primary data and from secondary data
  • Compare similarities and differences between two related sets of data, using a variety ofstrategies
  • Demonstrate, through investigation, an understanding of median
  • Predict the frequency of an outcome in a simple probability experiment, explaining their reasoning; conduct the experiment; and compare the result with the prediction

Grade 5

Number Sense and Numeration
By the end of Grade 5, students will:

  • Represent, compare, and order whole numbers and decimal numbers from 0.01 to1 000 000 000
  • Read and print in words whole numbers to one billion
  • Round decimal numbers to the nearest tenth, in problems
  • Represent, compare, and order fractional amounts with like denominators, including proper and improper fractions and mixed numbers
  • Demonstrate and explain the concept of equivalent fractions
  • Read and write money amounts to $1 000 000
  • Solve problems with whole numbers up to 1 000 000
  • Count forward by hundredths from any decimal number expressed to two decimal places
  • Solve problems involving the addition, subtraction, and multiplication of whole numbers, using a variety of mental strategies
  • Add and subtract decimal numbers to thousandths, including money amounts
  • Multiply three-digit whole numbers by three-digit whole numbers
  • Divide three-digit whole numbers by two digit whole numbers
  • Multiply decimal numbers by 10, 100, 1000 and divide by 10,100, and 1000, using mental strategies
  • Use estimation when solving problems to help judge the reasonableness of a solution
  • Determine and explain, through investigation using concrete materials, drawings, andcalculators, the relationship between fractions and their equivalent decimal forms

Measurement
By the end of Grade 5, students will:

  • Estimate, measure and represent time intervals and elapsed time to the nearest second
  • Measure and record temperatures
  • Estimate and measure the perimeter and area of regular and irregular polygons, using a variety of tools and strategies
  • Select and justify the most appropriate standard unit to measure length, height, width, and distance, and to measure the perimeter of various polygons
  • Solve problems requiring conversion from metres to centimetres and from kilometres to metres
  • Solve problems involving the relationship between a 12 hr. clock and a 24 hour clock
  • Solve problems requiring the estimation and calculation of perimeters and areas of rectangles
  • Determine, through investigation, the relationship between capacity and volume
  • Select and justify the most appropriate standard unit to measure mass

Geometry and Spatial Sense
By the end of Grade 5, students will:

  • Distinguish among polygons, regular polygons, and other two-dimensional shapes
  • Distinguish among prisms, pyramids, and other three-dimensional figures
  • Identify and classify acute, right, obtuse and straight angles
  • Measure and construct angles up to 180 degrees, using a protractor
  • Identify triangles and classify them according to angle and side properties
  • Use and compare grid systems commonly used on maps
  • Create and analyse designs by translating and/or reflecting a shape, or shapes

Patterning and Algebra
By the end of Grade 5, students will:

  • Make a table of values for a pattern that is generated by adding or subtracting a number to get the next term, or by multiplying or dividing by a constant to get the next term, given either the sequence, or the pattern rule in words
  • Demonstrate, through investigation, an understanding of variables as unknown quantities represented by a letter or other symbol

Data Management and Probability
By the end of Grade 5, students will:

  • Collect and organise discrete or continuous primary data and secondary data and display the data in charts, tables, and graphs that have appropriate titles, labels, and scales that suit the range and distribution of the data
  • Demonstrate an understanding of ‘sample groups’ to represent sets of data
  • Read, interpret, and draw conclusions from primary data and from secondary data,presented in charts, tables, and graphs
  • Compare similarities and differences between two sets of data, using a variety of strategies ( i.e., mean, median, and mode, by describing the shape of a data set across its range of values)
  • Pose and solve simple probability problems, and solve them by conducting probability experiments and selecting appropriate methods of recording the results

Download pdf: Mathematics Grade 1-5